Jill H. Casid
Elizabeth DeLoughrey
Sandra Harding
Debra Harry
Karla FC Holloway
Alondra Nelson
Sangeeta Ray
Londa Schiebinger
Gabriela Soto Laveaga
Priscilla Wald
Nicole Waligora-Davis

 

 

Jill H. Casid
Department of Art History, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Jill H. Casid is Assistant Professor of Visual Culture Studies in the Department of Art History at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. She received her B.A. from Princeton in Art History and Cultural Studies, an M.A. in Art History at the Courtauld Institute of Art, University of London, and her Ph.D. in Art History from Harvard. Her research in queer and postcolonial visual studies and in vision and aesthetics includes her book Sowing Empire: Landscape and Colonization and her forthcoming book Shadows of Enlightenment both with the University of Minnesota Press. She is also a professional photographer.

 

Elizabeth DeLoughrey
Department of English, Cornell University

Elizabeth DeLoughrey is Assistant Professor of English at Cornell University. She is the author of Routes and Roots: Navigating Caribbean and Pacific Island Literatures (forthcoming) and co-editor of the collection Caribbean Literature and the Environment: Between Nature and Culture (2005). She has published essays in postcolonial studies in journals such as Ariel, Interventions,and Thamyris and is working on a manuscript entitled Transplanting the Tropics: Globalizing the Seeds of Culture.

 

Sandra Harding
Department of Education and Women’s Studies, University of California, Los Angeles

Sandra Harding is Professor of Education and Women’s Studies at the University of California, Los Angeles. She is a philosopher and taught for two decades at the University of Delaware before joining UCLA in 1996. She directed the UCLA Center for the Study of Women for five years and currently co-edits Signs: Journal of Women in Culture and Society. She is the author or editor of twelve books and special journal issues, including The Science Question in Feminism, Whose Science? Whose Knowledge? Thinking From Women’s Lives and Is Science Multicultural? Postcolonialisms, Feminists, and Epistemologies. Her latest book, Science and Social Inequality: Feminist and Postcolonial Issues, is forthcoming (University of Illinois Press, 2006.)

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Debra Harry
Executive Director of the Indigenous Peoples Council on Biocolonialism

Debra Harry is Northern Paiute from Pyramid Lake, Nevada and the Executive Director of the Indigenous Peoples Council on Biocolonialism. She is the producer of the documentary film The Leech and the Earthworm, an IPCB/Yeast Directions production which examines the globalized hunt for genes within Indigenous territories and bodies and features Indigenous activists from around the world. In 1994, Debra received a three-year Kellogg Foundation leadership fellowship and studied the field of human genetic research and its implications for Indigenous peoples. She has recently contributed to the collection Rights and Liberties in the Biotech Age (edited by Sheldon Krimsky and Peter Shorett, Roman and Littlefield, 2005), which is an original volume of essays by leading scientists, policy experts and public interest advocates on the impact of genetic technologies on individual and collective rights.

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Karla FC Holloway
Department of English and Women’s Studies and Duke University School of Law

Karla FC Holloway is the William R. Kenan, Jr. Professor of English, Law, and Women’s Studies and the former Dean of the Humanities and Social Sciences at Duke University. She is the author of six books, including Passed On: African-American Mourning Stories. Her most recent manuscript, BookMarks: Reading in Black and White—A Memoir will be released this fall. Her public commentary regarding matters of death and dying in African American culture, and regarding the nation’s mourning following September 11th, has been featured on NPR. She is currently cultivating a project on biocultures, bioethics, and narrative. Professor Holloway is a core faculty member of Duke University’s Institute on the Care at the End of Life and serves on the Greenwall Foundation’s Advisory Board in Bioethics; the North Carolina Humanities Council; and the Princeton University Advisory Council: Program in the Study of Women and Gender.

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Alondra Nelson
Department of Sociology and African American Studies, Yale University

Alondra Nelson is Assistant Professor of Sociology and African American Studies at Yale University. Her current research interests include the socio-cultural implications of genetic science; African American health social movements and health activism; and racial formation processes in science, biomedicine, and technoculture. Professor Nelson is the co-editor (with Thuy Linh N. Tu) of Technicolor: Race, Technology, and Everyday Life. She is presently at work on Body and Soul: The Black Panther Party and the Politics of Race and Health, a forthcoming book about late-twentieth African American advocacy around issues of genetic disease, medicalized models of social unrest, and reproductive rights.

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Sangeeta Ray
Department of English, University of Maryland, College Park

Sangeeta Ray is Associate Professor in the English Department at the University of Maryland and the Director of the College Park Scholars American Cultures Program. She has in the past been the chair of the Asian American Studies program as well as the director of the Theory Certificate Program at the University of Maryland. She has published many articles in the field of postcolonial, feminist and cultural studies. She is the author of En-Gendering India: Woman and Nation in Colonial and Postcolonial Narratives (Duke UP 2000) and the co-editor of The Companion to Postcolonial Studies (Blackwell 2000). Her book on Gayatri Spivak is forthcoming from Blackwell and her current manuscript is tentatively titled Beyond Identity Politics: A Postcolonial Ethics of Reading.

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Londa Schiebinger
History of Science, and the Barbara D. Finberg Director of the Institute for Research on Women and Gender, Stanford University

Londa Schiebinger is Professor of History of Science and the Barbara D. Finberg Director of the Institute for Research on Women and Gender at Stanford University.  She is the author of numerous books such as The Mind Has No Sex? Women in the Origins of Modern Science, Nature's Body: Gender in the Making of Modern Science, Has Feminism Changed Science? and Plants and Empire: Colonial Bioprospecting in the Atlantic World. She has edited collections such as Feminism and the Body, and Colonial Botany:  Science, Commerce, and Politics. She is the recipient of numerous prizes and awards, including the Alexander von Humboldt Research Prize and Guggenheim Fellowship. 

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Gabriela Soto Laveaga
Department of History, University of California, Santa Barbara

Gabriela Soto Laveaga is Assistant Professor in the History Department at the University of California, Santa Barbara. Her areas of interests include modern Latin America, in particular Mexico, the intersection of science and culture, emerging citizenships, and history of medicine. She has published articles on traditional medicine and the state, the search for drugs, and has a co-edited volume on commodities and power in Mexico. She is currently completing work on her manuscript, Jungle Laboratories: Peasants, Mexican Identity and the Global Search for Hormones.

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Priscilla Wald
Department of English and Women’s Studies, Duke University

Priscilla Wald is Professor of English and Women's Studies at Duke University. Her research and teaching interests include U.S. literature and culture and cultural studies of science.  She is the author of Constituting Americans: Cultural Anxiety and Narrative Form (1995) and of Contagion: Cultures, Carriers, and the Epidemiology of Belonging (forthcoming, Duke UP).  She is currently at work on a book-length manuscript on the representation and social and cultural impact of genomics. She is associate editor of American Literature, and on the advisory board of PMLA and the editorial board of Literature and Medicine.

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Nicole Waligora-Davis
Department of English, Cornell University 

Nicole Waligora-Davis is Assistant Professor English at Cornell University. Her research interests include American and African American visual and cultural criticism, theories of race and gender, and black intellectual history. She is the associate editor of Remembering Jim Crow (2001). Her essays on African American and immigration studies have appeared in Modern Fiction Studies, Mississippi Quarterly, and The Forum for Modern Studies.  She is currently completing two manuscript projects, Sanctuary: Race, Asylum, and the American Empire, and The Murder Book: Race, Forensics, and Criminal Law.

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